Quilting: Conquering Quilt Doubts and Inner Critics

Conquering Quilt Doubts and Inner Critics

By Kathy Mathews

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Recently my quilt guild had the opportunity to apply to have quilts with a pre-chosen topic be shown at a Major Quilt Show. It was pretty exciting and I submitted mine for consideration. Yay! I got in! I was very happy.

I was surprised when a fellow guild member did not submit hers for consideration and it reminded me of myself last year. We had the same opportunity then and I nearly didn’t take a chance for a number of reasons. I think many quilters battle these inner critics for not making, not finishing, not liking, not giving or not showing a quilt. I want to address each reason and rip it apart by the proverbial seams.

My quilt is not perfect – Yes, that is true. It is also true for every quilt by every quilter that has ever been made. Welcome to the club of imperfect quilters with imperfect quilts. Isn’t it a great club? No one and nothing is perfect so you can stop worrying about that.

Look at this flaw – Oh that insignificant flaw right there that I would have never seen? The one that I thought was part of the design? The one that no one will notice unless you point it out to them? Would you point that out on a Friend’s quilt or a stranger’s? Then stop doing it to your own.

It is slightly different from the directions – Last year I panicked because my quilt was not 36” by 36” but instead one side was 35.75” and another was about 35.6. Then I realized that the human eye couldn’t detect that difference and I was entering a photograph where no one would be able to tell. Plus it was my quilt, the very size I made it.

I don’t like this aspect; I will redo it – If you want another quilt, go for it. But it is NOT a replacement for this lovely one. Submit this one, finish this one, this imperfect wonderful quilt. This is not homework; it is fun and a hobby. You are sabotaging yourself. Cut it out!

I didn’t finish on time – I have used this excuse myself. This way your quilt didn’t fail to get in or be appreciated, it just wasn’t done on time. If that is truly the reason, submit it, give it or show it next year.

It will never be accepted – So what? Then you can get yourself a t-shirt and proclaim your quilt is a reject and laugh about it. The quilt is still fabulous.

The recipient won’t want a quilt of mine – If someone for whom you are making a quilt will not appreciate it then do not give it to him or her. This says much more about that person then your quilt. Keep it or give it to a more worthy recipient. Some people are not quilt worthy!

Another quilter told me what was wrong with my quilt – Oh really? And what the heck is wrong with that quilter? Jealous?Rude? Mean? Limited social graces? A know it all? Your quilt might not win best in show but you could always grow and improve and make one in the future that would. That quilter will probably be miserable forever. Love that quilt!

This top isn’t worth quilting – How many people do you know that have a favorite quilt top? No one that I know. Everyone has a favorite quilt that keeps them warm and gives them comfort. The most pathetic quilt I ever made is the one my daughter and granddaughter snuggle under every single day. They adore that quilt. Go and finish yours!

I’m the worst quilter I know – Then you don’t know many people. Most of the people I know can’t quilt at all. The fact that you can sew puts you in a unique and special group. You make quilts? Even more so! You are making the best quilt right now that you are making now. Finish it and see how many people LOVE it.

I’ve seen way better quilts in shows or online – I have too. Those are their highlight reels, their best of the best. Do not compare your first quilt, worst quilt or even best quilt to some professional who may or may not have help cutting, sewing, designing or quilting that masterpiece. That quilter may well have bad breath. Your quilts are great!

Quilters make quilts because they want to exercise their brains, play with fabric and meet other quilters. They make them for their beds, their walls, their friends, their pets and their family. Don’t be the quilter who makes quilts to have one more thing to feel bad about. Finish them and feel the joy.

Your quilts are wonderful just like you!

CLICK HERE FOR GREAT DEALS ON SCISSORS

CTA with 5.5 inch curved scissors

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Quilting: What Is The Most Important Part of A Quilt

What’s the most important part of a quilt?

By Kathleen Mathews

beautiful quilted wheels

 

I have a quilt in my head nearly all the time. I might be thinking about one I’ve made, am making or want to make. Those frisky quilts that I want to make prompt me to stop at quilt stores, haul fabrics out of my stash when I am smack dab in the middleof another project and call my name. The yet to made quilts are perfect. I’ve found the greatest fabric, the actual quilt matches my fantasy and everything is sewn per.fect.ly.

None of my actual already made quilts are perfect, no way. But I love them all the same. Somehow, in spite of whatever missteps I may make, I love the whole completed quilt. And I find I really don’t like a quilt as I am making it, I change it up or stop. The reasons why vary which begs the question, what is the most important part of a quilt? What is the element that makes or breaks a quilt?

Maybe it’s the fabric. Certainly we all spend a lot of time buying fabric. Heck, I buy it all over the world. If I love it I buy lots and I figure out later what I am going to do with it. So is that the most important part? Maybe! However, I am currently in a round robin and one participant sent a gorgeous center block that had stimulated tremendous additions by the other Round Robin participants and the fabric was kindof lousy. Nope, really lousy. You could see through the white and it was very cheap fabric. But oh I lusted after that quilt!

Hmmm, if I coveted a quilt with lousy fabric that wasn’t even finished then design must be the trump card, the central element that makes a quilt. Maybe? But I have seen quilts which are clever and well designed and should work, they really should. But somehow, they just don’t sing. And I’ve seen colorful Gee’s Bend quilts many of which have no discernible design and they make me want to grab them and shout MINE, ALL MINE as I run for the hills!

There’s a thought, color. There are color workshops in every quilt store in America. There are color wheels, hand dyed fabrics and color swatches so you get exactly that shade of frosted apricot blush that you want, no NEED for your quilt. And then there are threads in every pastel, bold, classic, blended shade a computer can come up with. Now we know, it’s color. Or is it? If that is true, why are whole cloth quilts so stunning? It’s just one piece, one color and a whole lot of gorgeous stitching.

Now we are getting somewhere. It’s the stitching. It’s the perfect corners, the 12 stitches to an inch and the diamonds whose points are as sharp as a knife. It must be the impeccable binding whose endings and beginnings are a mystery known only to the creator.

It feels good to have nailed down the most important element of a quilt, the sewing itself. Phew, I am glad that is settled. Hold on there for a minute, partner. Let’s not rush to judgment. So that must mean that the quilts that sell, gather votes and grace our beds as well as our walls are sewn with impeccable skill. Those are the quilts that sing?

Maybe for some they do but not always to ME. I have seen some gorgeous examples of skill beyond my wildest dreams made by expert Amish quilters. There is not a discernible error in the entire quilt and I admire the heck out of the skill of that quilter. But the fabric might be meh, the colors blah and the design overdone and trite.

I have personally seen beautiful skills create a quilt that doesn’t speak to me. I have experienced fabulous designs that just don’t work. I have seen gorgeous fabrics and exciting colors that are squandered in a quilt that just doesn’t grab me.

On the opposite side, I have seen poorly constructed quilts that are truly works of art. Some quilts have colors that have faded but have left the beauty behind. I’ve been lucky enough to view quilts made out of leftovers, used jeans or flour sacks that make me gasp with pleasure.

We can focus on just the right fabric, using the unaccessibly correct color theory, honing our skills and designs that are time tested and not be guaranteed a quilt that will please us in the end. I think that is the most important aspect, which has to be the goal, to please the maker when it is done.

I contend that there is not one most important element when making a quilt. The magic that is a quilt is between the maker and the quilt and subsequently those who behold this masterpiece. If it whispers in your ear and makes you happy then that is the most important element, the enjoyment.

I love luscious fabrics, vibrant or rich colors, master level skills and clever designs. But more than all of that, I want to adore my quilts and your quilts. I want some intangible element to grab me by the lapels and make me smile at that fabric magically transformed into the wonder that is a quilt.

Magic, maybe that’s the most important part of making a quilt. Abracadabra, let’s go make some now.

LEST WE FORGET, THE BEST SCISSORS ARE JUST AS IMPORTANT AS EACH PART OF THE QUILT

CTA with 5.5 inch curved scissors

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Craft Project – Fly Your Own Flags

By Jamie Fingal

Jamie is author, teacher, and now, fabric designer!  Be sure to visit Hoffman Fabrics and check out the Heart & Soul Sisters line.  This fabric line is also featured in our “Cut to the Point” Quilt Contest Childhood Memories.

Happy New Year everyone!  Fly Your Own Flags for January with brave, strong and bold girls.  Each flag is 6x8 inches, vertical format.  These are easy peasy.  No batting, no binding.  Just fun.

Happy New Year everyone! Fly Your Own Flags for January with brave, strong and bold girls. Each flag is 6×8 inches, vertical format. These are easy peasy. No batting, no binding. Just fun.

Mistyfuse and a Goddess Sheet or Parchment Paper Rotary cutter, mat and ruler You will need to pre-fuse all of your fabrics for this project.  I didn’t use this particular fabric for this project, but you can get an idea of how to fuse using Mistyfuse.   I rolled out the Mistyfuse from this 35” bolt.  I usually fuse very large quantities of fabric in my studio to make quilts for my fabric lines, so that is why this is so large.

Mistyfuse and a Goddess Sheet or Parchment Paper
Rotary cutter, mat and ruler
You will need to pre-fuse all of your fabrics for this project. I didn’t use this particular fabric for this project, but you can get an idea of how to fuse using Mistyfuse. I rolled out the Mistyfuse from this 35” bolt. I usually fuse very large quantities of fabric in my studio to make quilts for my fabric lines, so that is why this is so large.

I lay a Goddess Sheet over the top.  This happens to be a Holy Cow one – the largest and it covers the entire surface of my design table, and the fabric. Mistyfuse has Goddess Sheets in many different sizes for even the smallest pieces of fabric.  With an iron on the cotton setting, press the Mistyfuse into place on the fabric.  The Goddess Sheet will protect your iron and make the fuse to the fabric even better.  Make sure that you iron all of the way to the edges.  If you lift up one corner, and see that it is not bonded, go over it again with your iron.  Wait for it to cool before removing it carefully.

I lay a Goddess Sheet over the top. This happens to be a Holy Cow one – the largest and it covers the entire surface of my design table, and the fabric. Mistyfuse has Goddess Sheets in many different sizes for even the smallest pieces of fabric. With an iron on the cotton setting, press the Mistyfuse into place on the fabric. The Goddess Sheet will protect your iron and make the fuse to the fabric even better. Make sure that you iron all of the way to the edges. If you lift up one corner, and see that it is not bonded, go over it again with your iron. Wait for it to cool before removing it carefully.

Materials:  ½ yard of black wool blended felt by National Nonwovens #TOY002, available at big box sewing stores and some quilting stores.  It is a more narrow bolt, so it is easy to find on shelves.  I would not recommend using polyester felt, because it is not a secure substance in which it iron on.  Also, you will need about a ½ yard of the same wool blended felt in a fun color for the back. Fabric?  The fabric that I am using for this ‘tutorial’ is from my fabric line “Heart and Soul Sisters” by Hoffman California Fabrics.  It came out in December 2014.   I used about ¼ yard of the girl fabric and the text fabric, but you may want more, because there are other things that you can make with it. To start.  Cut 3 pieces of wool blended felt – 6” x 8”

Materials: ½ yard of black wool blended felt by National Nonwovens #TOY002, available at big box sewing stores and some quilting stores. It is a more narrow bolt, so it is easy to find on shelves. I would not recommend using polyester felt, because it is not a secure substance in which it iron on. Also, you will need about a ½ yard of the same wool blended felt in a fun color for the back.
Fabric? The fabric that I am using for this ‘tutorial’ is from my fabric line “Heart and Soul Sisters” by Hoffman California Fabrics. It came out in December 2014.
I used about ¼ yard of the girl fabric and the text fabric, but you may want more, because there are other things that you can make with it.
To start. Cut 3 pieces of wool blended felt – 6” x 8”

Your fused fabric will look shiny like this.  Don’t fold it right away.  Just lay it on a flat surface or over a drying rack.  You can use it right away.  Let it dry at bit before you fold it to store on a shelf or in a drawer for another day.  It will never dry out or flake off the fabric.  It doesn’t change the hand of the cloth and you can sew by machine or by hand easily.  I have fused very large pieces, such as this, and very small pieces, the size of my finger.

Your fused fabric will look shiny like this. Don’t fold it right away. Just lay it on a flat surface or over a drying rack. You can use it right away. Let it dry at bit before you fold it to store on a shelf or in a drawer for another day. It will never dry out or flake off the fabric. It doesn’t change the hand of the cloth and you can sew by machine or by hand easily. I have fused very large pieces, such as this, and very small pieces, the size of my finger.

Here is the girl fabric.  This has been pre-fused with Mistyfuse.  Each one of these squares is 2”.  All of the artwork is from my drawings.  It is totally fun to see them come alive on fabric.  This is the perfect fabric for this project, because of the grid design.

Here is the girl fabric. This has been pre-fused with Mistyfuse. Each one of these squares is 2”. All of the artwork is from my drawings. It is totally fun to see them come alive on fabric. This is the perfect fabric for this project, because of the grid design.

This is the text fabric.  All about brave, bold and strong girls.  Heart and Soul Sisters.  Dream big to live the life you imagined for yourself.

This is the text fabric. All about brave, bold and strong girls. Heart and Soul Sisters. Dream big to live the life you imagined for yourself.

Place your focus fabric on each of the felt foundations.  There will be a space at the top, but it will be covered with another piece of fabric.  Press into place.

Place your focus fabric on each of the felt foundations. There will be a space at the top, but it will be covered with another piece of fabric. Press into place.

Using some of the leftover 2” squares from the girl fabric and some of the artwork from the text fabric, select the words that you want, cut, and place them on the upper portion of the flag.  Press into place.

Using some of the leftover 2” squares from the girl fabric and some of the artwork from the text fabric, select the words that you want, cut, and place them on the upper portion of the flag. Press into place.

Trim the excess fabric off the edges, by turning it over and cut from the back, using the felt as your guide.

Trim the excess fabric off the edges, by turning it over and cut from the back, using the felt as your guide.

Select the text that you want for the lower portion and press into place.

Select the text that you want for the lower portion and press into place.

Using the squares, you can cut them into smaller pieces and add them to your flags, to add more color, interest and fun.

Using the squares, you can cut them into smaller pieces and add them to your flags, to add more color, interest and fun.

Like here is an example.  You can use more grid squares and artwork from the text fabric. It brightens up the entire piece!

Like here is an example. You can use more grid squares and artwork from the text fabric. It brightens up the entire piece!

Back your flags with another piece of wool blended felt in another color.  They don’t have to be cut perfectly, but you want the color to be visible from the front.  These are ready to take to the sewing machine for some free motion machine quilting.  Are you ready?

Back your flags with another piece of wool blended felt in another color. They don’t have to be cut perfectly, but you want the color to be visible from the front. These are ready to take to the sewing machine for some free motion machine quilting. Are you ready?

The first thing that I did was to free motion zig zag around the edges of each flag.  If you are uncomfortable with using a free motion foot, like shown here, you can use the #1 foot with the feed dogs up to zig zag around all of the edges.

The first thing that I did was to free motion zig zag around the edges of each flag. If you are uncomfortable with using a free motion foot, like shown here, you can use the #1 foot with the feed dogs up to zig zag around all of the edges.

This is pretty simple, and a great way to practice free motion machine quilting.  Just guide your needle around the squares and the lettering.  Be sure to get the small shapes inside of the squares.  It doesn’t matter if you cross the lines or go over something twice.

This is pretty simple, and a great way to practice free motion machine quilting. Just guide your needle around the squares and the lettering. Be sure to get the small shapes inside of the squares. It doesn’t matter if you cross the lines or go over something twice.

Here is what the back looks like.  Don’t stress yourself out.  I didn’t take my needle around the girls.  You could, if you so desire, but it is not necessary.

Here is what the back looks like. Don’t stress yourself out. I didn’t take my needle around the girls. You could, if you so desire, but it is not necessary.

When you are finished free motion quilting all three pieces, trim the colored felt with a rotary cutter, ruler on a cutting mat.  You want to have a bit of it show through from the front.  It’s a design element, and brings out the colors on your piece.

When you are finished free motion quilting all three pieces, trim the colored felt with a rotary cutter, ruler on a cutting mat. You want to have a bit of it show through from the front. It’s a design element, and brings out the colors on your piece.

Like this.  Great flags to hang in your own studio, or give to a friend.  I attach them to laundry line in my studio, securing them with wooden clothes pins.  Totally inspirational.

Like this. Great flags to hang in your own studio, or give to a friend. I attach them to laundry line in my studio, securing them with wooden clothes pins. Totally inspirational.

Be Brave

Be Brave

Be Strong

Be Strong

Be Bold

Be Bold

Fly Your Own Flags – Be Brave, Be Strong, Be Bold

Fly Your Own Flags – Be Brave, Be Strong, Be Bold

CLICK HERE FOR THE PRODUCTS FEATURED

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT JAMIE FINGAL

Posted in art ideas, Craft to make, Crafting, Cutting Mat, Fabric, Fabric Art, Fabric Rotary Cutters, Fiber Art, Free Craft Projects, Fun Stuff, Jamie Fingal, Uncategorized, Wall Hangings | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

“Cut To The Point” Quilt Contest

ENTER TO WIN OUR CUT TO THE POINT QUILT CONTEST – 1st PRIZE: BERNINA  215!  CLICK HERE FOR CONTEST RULES AND ENTRY FORM.

 

"Cut To The Point" Quilt Contest

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Free Project: Make a Messenger Bag & iPad Case

Messenger Bag & iPad Case by Liz Kettle

photo 1(a)

Nothing says back to school like a brand new book bag! Times have changed though, and in addition to the traditional bag, we need an iPad or Tablet case too. These simple and quick projects will have you ready for back to school in no time flat so you can enjoy the last remaining moments of summer.

Supplies:

Multi-Purpose cloth or canvas
Fabrics of choice
Batting (optional) choose a very flat batting such as Thermore
Misty Fuse or other fusible web
Rotary cutter with traditional and skip blades
Embroidery scissors
Hand Needles: 22 or 18 chenille or tapestry or a yarn darner
Machine Needles: size 90 sharp

A note about Multi-purpose cloth: Multi-Purpose Cloth or MPC is a wonderful non-woven canvas that is perfect for bags, totes, home décor and much more. It holds its shape better than canvas and is a dream to stitch through. MPC can also be painted with any type of fabric paint and you can skip the fabric layer all together.i

iPad or Tablet Case

photo 2(a)

Using a rotary cutter, ruler and cutting mat, cut a piece of Multi Purpose Cloth 10 1/2″ x 24″. I prefer the larger 60mm rotary cutter for basic cutting because it cuts through everything so easily and it feels like I am done faster with the bigger blade.
Choose your fabrics. The case is made from just one piece of MPC so if you have a directional print like I do, you may want to cut it and piece it, to ensure the print is the proper direction when
the flap is folded over.
If you don’t have a directional print, simply cut your fabric 10 1/2″ x 24″.
If you do have a directional print, you will want to cut the main piece 10 1/2″ x 17 1/4″ and the piece that is for the front flap 10 1/2″ x 7 1/4″.
Piece the two fabrics together to create a piece that is 10 1/2″ x 24″.
Batting (optional): You may want to skip it for your first case. If you want to add a flat
batting, cut it 10 1/2″ x 24″.
Layer the MPC with a thin piece of batting and your fabric piece. Pin or fuse the layers together with Misty Fuse. I like Misty Fuse because it doesn’t add a lot of weight to the project and stiffen it, and I know the layers won’t shift while I am quilting it.

photo 3(a)

Choose some simple quilting for the surface. I stitched diagonal lines on the lower portion, and stitched around the text printed on the fabric on the flap portion. I use my indispensable 5″ double curved embroidery scissors to snip the threads between each of the layers. I don’t know how I lived without these scissors! They are perfect for snipping threads at the machine. The holes are faced up so they are really fast to pick up and the sharp points easily slide under the tightest thread snarl. Best of all, the gentle curve prevents me from accidently snipping my fabric. When I can’t find my seam ripper (a fairly common occurrence) I even use these to easily un-sew.

photo 4(a)

If you desire, you can also fuse a layer of fabric on the inside of the flap,
but it is perfectly fine to leave the MPC bare on the inside of the case.
If you do decide to line the flap with fabric, cut fabric and Misty Fuse 10 1/2″ x 9″.
Do not add batting to this layer. Double check to make sure you are fusing on to the back of the flap.
If you would like to create a small cut-out in the front panel of the case to make it easier to slip things in and out, do so now. I made a template to make the process easier because I make a lot of these bags. Cut a piece of card stock 10 1/2″ x 3″. Draw a line 1 1/2″ from one edge. Mark in from each edge 1 1/2″ and draw a 30 degree angle to join the lines. Cut out the resulting piece from your template. This is only a guideline you can make your cut out, any size you like, or even curved!

photo 5(a)

photo 6(a)

Mark the opening with a chalk pencil and then cut out with shears.
The micro serrated Havel’s shears help to cut nice sharp turns because
they hold on to the fabric while you turn it.

photo 7(a)

To finish this edge use a zigzag stitch.

photo 8(a)

Load the skip cutting blade into your rotary cutter. Cut along the length of the fabric 1/4″ from each long edge and the front edge. The skip blade will make tiny slits along the edge but not cut off the fabric. Press hard to ensure you go through all layers of fabric. You can not re-cut if you don’t go through all layers. For this reason I suggest that you practice on a scrap of MPC layered with batting and fabric to get the feel of how hard you have to press to go through all the layers.
Next we will lace up the sides of the case. I used ripped strips of fabric for my case but I have also used ribbon, rayon seam tape and thick yarn. The ribbon and seam tape give the most polished look and the ripped fabric the most casual look. Ripped fabric strips, ribbon or seam tape should be between 3/8″ and 1/2″.

photo 9(a)

Fold the bottom half of the case up 8 1/2″. Thread your ribbon or fabric strips onto your large needle. Begin at the very bottom of the case and insert your needle from the inside of the case to bring it out the lowest slit created by the skip blade. Leave a tail, you will tuck this inside as you stitch to
encase it in the seam.

photo 10(a)

Use a simple whip stitch all the way up the side of the case, around the flap edge and down the other side. Simply thread the needle through the slits along the edge. This photo shows me stitching top to bottom but you may find bottom to top easier. When you need to add another strip of fabric simply tie the two pieces in a knot and continue stitching. If you like a neater edge you can work the tails into the seam with the large eye needle or a bodkin.

photo 11(a)

Messenger Bag

Cut a piece of Multi Purpose Cloth 15″ wide by 37″ long.
Cut a piece of Multi Purpose Cloth 2″ wide by 48″ long for the strap.
Cut Misty Fuse to cover both sides of the MPC main piece and the strap.
I did not use batting in this piece because of the bulk it would add to the side seams.

photo 12(a)

With this larger piece it is easier to pre-fuse the Misty Fuse to the MPC before fusing down the fabric. Place the Misty Fuse on the bag fabric, cover with a Teflon pressing sheet and heat with an iron. This is especially helpful if you have a directional print as I did. Once again the bag is made from one piece of MPC so I cut the fabrics into three pieces to keep the text oriented correctly.
If your print is not directional, cut your fabric 15″ wide by 37″ long.
If your print is directional, cut three pieces:
The flap will be 15″ wide by 10 1/2″ long.
The two remaining pieces will be 15″ wide by 13″ long

photo 13(a)

Place the fabrics on the pre-fused Multi-Purpose Cloth and fuse with a hot iron.

photo 14(a)

In this photo you can see the placement of the directional prints.

photo 15(a)

Quilt the piece by stitching as desired. I simply outlined some of the images
using an organic free motion stitch.

photo 16(a)

If desired, use Misty Fuse to fuse fabrics to the back of the Multi-Purpose Cloth.
You can cover the entire back (lining of the bag) or just the flap area.

photo 17(a)

Trim the front flap by cutting a 10 1/4″ x 1 1/2″ strip off of both sides of the flap section.

photo 18(a)

photo 19(a)

Finish the flap edges and the other edge with a satin stitch.

photo 20(a)

With right sides facing, fold the bottom half of the bag up 13″. The end of the bag should be right at the edge of the flap cut outs. Pin the edges. Stitch a 1/4″ seam along each edge. I used a serger for a strong seam. If you don’t have a serger simply stitch a straight stitch and then finish the
inside edge with a zigzag stitch.

photo 21(a)

To create the bottom base of the bag fold the bag as shown
with the seam in the middle of the triangle.

photo 22(a)

Mark a stitch line 1 3/4″ from the point of the triangle.

photo 23(a)

Stitch across this line. Then trim off the remaining triangle leaving a 1/4″ edge.

photo 24(a)

Serge the edge or zigzag stitch. Turn your bag right side out and set aside.

photo 25(a)

To make the strap, fuse fabric to both sides of the Multi-Purpose Cloth. Stitch along the length in straight lines or as desired. Finish the edges with a satin stitch.

photo 26(a)

Center the strap on the side of the bag 2″ from the top edge of the bag.
Stitch around the edges and across the center as shown.
You can find Multi Purpose Cloth, and Havel’s scissors
and skip blades at these on-line stores:
www.ArtisticArtifacts.com
www.BlueTwigStudio.com
Fabrics used in this project are available at Artistic Artifacts.

Liz Kettle

Liz Kettle is a mixed media and textile artist living in Colorado. She is
co-author of two books, Fabric Embellishing: The Basics and Beyond, and Threads: The Basics and Beyond. Liz loves teaching and sharing the joy of making the things in her articles, classes and at her fabulous retreat, Textile Evolution. Visit her blog and website, www.TextileEvolution.com

Get the Tools You Need Here

For a printable PDF version of Liz’s Messenger Bag and IPad Case, click here.

Posted in Embroidery, Embroidery Scissors, Fabric, Free Quilt Projects, Fun Stuff, Guest Writers, Liz Kettle, Quilting, School, Tutorials, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments