Free Quilt Pattern – Pumpkin Patch Centerpiece

Free Quilt Pattern: A Pumpkin Patch Centerpiece

By Terry White ©2012

This bright modern pumpkin patch centerpiece can stay on your table all season long. It can be also be used as a wall hanging. The design also works well as a quilt pattern. Add a few borders and it will be large enough for a throw….I think plaid in fall colors would be lovely.

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I used linen as the base fabric for this quilt applique project. Linen can be found in the drapery section of your fabric store (sometimes on the bargain tables) and it is usually at least 50 inches wide. Good substitutes for linen are osnaburg and heavy weight muslin or homespun.

Wool felt is so easy to work with; it has so much body, comes in great colors and is easy to cut. You can simply fuse the wool to the linen and be done (as seen in the photo) or stitch it down….which I intend to do when I finish writing this quilt pattern for the Havel’s blog!

When you look at this design, you are looking down at the top of a large pumpkin. The pumpkin leaves and vines are surrounding the central pumpkin with little orange, purple and red pumpkins growing in the corners. This pattern was so much fun to design!

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Materials List

  • Linen square cut 36”
  • Linen or cotton fabric 36” square for backwool-felt-640x584
  • 18” squares of wool felt in the following colors:
  • Gold, deep gold, orange, rose, purple, green
  • Medium weight fusible interfacing 36” square
  • Fusible web for backing 36” square
  • 1 yard fusible web for appliqué pieces
  • 30 weight cotton thread in orange
  • 30 weight cotton thread in linen color
  • 30 weight cotton thread to match wool felt (if you choose to stitch
    the pieces down)

Supplies

Start by preparing the linen or other even weave fabric. Cut it to 36” square. To do that, make a little cut at the 36” mark and pull threads. Cut along the line that the pulled threads make. When cut, pull a few more threads so that you have a fringe. Square up the fabric and press with sizing (I use a lot of sizing).

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Next, fuse the iron-on interfacing to the back of the linen.

Fold the linen square in half and finger press a few inches in the center. Fold the square in half the other way and finger press the same way. Mark the intersection with a fabric marker. You will center the pumpkin stem on this mark.

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Trace the pattern pieces onto the fusible web. I like to use a mechanical pencil. Trace all the pieces together that will be cut from the same color wool.

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Iron the fusible web to the wool according to manufacturer’s instructions.

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Carefully cut out the pieces. I like to use Havel’s small curved embroidery scissors because they give me better control. The curved blade helps me to cut lovely curved shapes.

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Here is a tip for using fusible web: Pull away part of the paper backing before cutting out the shape. That way it is very easy to pull the paper away from the appliqué….it gives you a starting point.

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As you cut out the shapes, lay them out on your ironing board or other fabric covered surface. This way, you can see if you like your color choices. Pull away the backing paper before you lay out your appliqués onto the linen. Arrange the shapes according to the photo. You can use a yardstick to help with placement. The central pumpkin is divided into eight equal parts, so you can line up the pieces along the yardstick top to bottom and side to side.

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(Use your colored fabric markers to draw details on the small pumpkins if you are not going to stitch the appliqué down.)

To stitch details on the small pumpkins, turn each upside down and use a long straight stitch following the drawn lines on fusible web paper backing. Stitch each line three times. Use the colored thread in the bobbin. I used Star cotton orange variegated thread. I used the same color for the gold, purple and red pumpkins.

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Trim the threads and pull the paper backing away.

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Gather the threads to the back of the appliqué. When you iron the shape to the linen capture the threads underneath.

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Lay out your pieces onto the linen and fuse. Set your iron to wool. The wool is thick and it takes a while to heat through the wool enough for the fusible to melt. Patience is required at this step. Heat a section at a time and go back over it several times. Once the fusible is melted and the felt is secure….it is really secure.

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Here are the pretty threads I’ve chosen to stitch my appliqués.

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The photo shows an open appliqué foot. I am using a buttonhole or blanket stitch and you can see that I can get right at the edge of the appliqué because I can see it. I lowered the top tension (thread tension) so that the thread can move freely and make a full beautiful stitch. I suggest you test your threads, settings and materials before stitching.

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After all the stitching, the next step is to fuse your backing fabric to the back of the panel.

Make the backing about an inch smaller than your finished panel.

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Fold and press the top of the panel to the back.

When starched linen is folded and pressed like this, it is very stable and doesn’t move around too much. However, if you want, you can use fabric glue or fusible hem tape to glue it in place.

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Stitching from the top, use the linen colored thread and a large blanket or buttonhole stitch to sew along the edge. I use the same thread in the bobbin as the top, and lower the top thread tension for a full stitch. I used a variegated linen color thread.

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Click here to print out the pattern pieces
for the Fall Pumpkin Appliqué Centerpiece.


Click Here For the Tools You Need

Download your FREE copy of
Terry White’s eBook…

Posted in Applique, Craft to make, Fabric Art, For Beginners in Sewing, Free Craft Projects, Free Quilt Projects, Fun Stuff, Guest Writers, Holiday Projects, How To, Seasonal, Terry White, Thanksgiving, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 7 Comments

How to make a scarf: Chenille Style!

Chenille Scarf by Ruth Chandler

brittany wearing chenille scarfThis technique uses a special rotary cutter that has a guide on the bottom of the blade to prevent all layers of fabric from being cut. There are two ways to accomplish the fraying that makes the chenille. First, you can cut the fabric at a 45 degree angle, second you can stitch the fabric at a 45 degree angle. Without this angle the fabric will not fray nicely and you will be disappointed with your results.

Supplies:

There are two different options to choose from
when making your chenille scarf…

Option #1 – Fabric cut at 45 degree angle:

Stitch lines 1/2" apart from end to end

Stitch lines 1/2″ apart, from end to end.

  • First, press your fabric. I like to use a light starch spray such as Best Press. It will allow you to get a more controlled cut.
  • Lay the fabric out on a large table with the cutting mat under the fabric.
  • Using your ruler, find the 45 degree angle.
  • Line it up on a selvage edge of the fabric and draw a line along the ruler on the fabric. You will have to move your ruler keeping it lined up with the marking line until the line reaches across to the other selvage.
  • Now is the time to decide how wide you want your scarf, I would suggest no narrower than 6 inches and no wider than 12 inches.
  • Use at least 4 layers of fabric but no more than 6… I used 5. More than six layers and the scarf will be too bulky and the cutter will have a difficult time cutting through all the layers. Not to mention the wear and tear on your hands!
  • Now for the layering – the bottom (or first) layer needs to be right side DOWN.
  • Place the other layers right side UP on the first (or bottom) layer.
  • Pin the layers together, matching up the edges and smoothing out any wrinkles. Take your time with this step and use lots of pins, especially with the rayon.
  • If the edges are a little off that is okay, we will trim it up at the end.

Now it is time to stitch. Stitch from one end to the other, length wise. I used the markings on my machine throat plate to guide the stitch lines, but if you are not comfortable with that you can mark lines with your marking pencil. Try to keep the markings as faint as possible so they are easier to wash out. The chenille cutter has instructions on the package, it is important to read these so you can choose the right blade guide for your scarf. My stitch lines were a ½ inch apart so I used the medium 6mm guide. This worked well on the 5 layers of rayon that I cut at the 45 degree angle.

  • chenille pix trio 309x640Start at the right edge and stitch lines ½ inch apart end to end, until you have filled the whole scarf.
  • Make sure to backstitch at the beginning and end of each row to hold the stitching.
  • Lay the scarf out on the cutting mat.
  • Prior to this next step, engage your chenille blade in preparation for cutting.
  • You may want to snip the ends of your rows first with scissors, to get started.
  • Now, slide the cutter guide into the first row of stitching under all layers EXCEPT the bottom layer – do NOT cut the bottom layer of fabric!
  • Slide the cutter along the row and repeat this process till all rows are cut.
  • Be sure the guide is flat on the table, it will work more smoothly.
  • Sometimes a few fibers from the fabric will catch on the guide, simply pull the fibers out using a pair of tweezers.
  • If you want a little fringe at the ends of the scarf, you can cut through all layers to separate them. I would suggest not cutting the fringe any longer than 4 inches.

 

close up of chenille scarf after washing

Here is a close-up of the chenille scarf
after it’s been washed.

Now comes the magic part! Throw the scarf in the washer. I suggest a few towels also. Wash on a regular cycle. When you pull it out it will be frayed! Dry it with the towels, (you may have to shake your towels outside to get rid of stray threads) and when it is dry you will have a beautiful scarf! If the edges need to be trimmed to make it less ragged on the edges, use your straight rotary cutter to trim the outside edges.

Option #2 – Fabric stitched at 45 degree angle:

  • This technique takes a lot more time and thread.
  • Press and starch the fabric.
  • Lay the fabric out and cut 5, 8″ wide strips the length of the fabric.
  • You should have 5, 8″ x 72″ strips.
  • Lay the first strip right side DOWN.
  • Layer the next 4 strips right side UP.
  • Pin all layers together.
  • Find the 45 degree angle on your ruler and mark across the scarf starting at one narrow end and working down to the other.
  • Stitch along the markings, be sure to backstitch at the beginning and the end of each row.
  • Stitch all rows.
  • Prior to this next step, engage your chenille blade in preparation for cutting.

  • You may want to snip the ends of your rows first with scissors, to get started.
  • Now, slide the cutter guide into the first row of stitching under all layers EXCEPT the bottom layer – do NOT cut the bottom layer of fabric!
  • Slide the cutter along the row and repeat this process till all rows are cut.
  • If the guide is flat on the table it will work more smoothly.
  • Follow the above directions for washing and drying.

I hope you enjoy making a scarf to match your personal style. As always, I love it when you send me photos of your finished work.

Ruth

Click here for more more projects by Ruth Chandler

Posted in Fabric Art, Free Craft Projects, Fun Stuff, How To, Ruth Chandler, Tutorials, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Modern Baby Craft

By Jamie Fingal

Learn to make a whimsical wall hanging to celebrate the birth of a new baby girl and/or baby boy.  The girl has a dress and the boy has overalls, and they hang on a baby hanger.  They are each unique and fun, and personalized.  You can add your own touches, like lace, unusual buttons, funky baby hangers.  This is a perfect craft to make in an afternoon, and you’ve got something really unique that you can give as a gift or keep for yourself.

 

Whimsical Baby Girl

The girl wall hanging, sweet and simple!

 

 

The boy wall hanging.  Cute as a button.

The boy wall hanging. Cute as a button.

 

Pattern, not to scale, but you can get an idea of the dimensions for each.  The upper portion fold over, like a top of a shirt.  It enables the hanger to work correctly, and finishes the piece nicely.  You can make a pattern on a piece of larger paper, and draw the dimensions.  Then cut out whichever pattern you want to make.  Just wait to cut out the neck opening.

Pattern, not to scale, but you can get an idea of the dimensions for each. The upper portion fold over, like a top of a shirt. It enables the hanger to work correctly, and finishes the piece nicely. You can make a pattern on a piece of larger paper, and draw the dimensions. Then cut out whichever pattern you want to make. Just wait to cut out the neck opening.

Havel's Sewing 60MM Rotary Cutter

Havel’s Sewing 60MM Rotary Cutter

Materials List

2 pieces of black wool blended felt, National Nonwovens #TOY002 12” wide x 15” long

12” wide for each piece;  one blue, pink

Scraps of pre-fused fabrics.  2 contrasting fabrics

White fabric for the text

Baby Hangers, which are about 10” across

Girl – 5 mother of pearl buttons

Boy – 5 contrasting color buttons, and 2 for the straps

Dimensions for the boy overalls, so you can make your own pattern

Dimensions for the boy overalls, so you can make your own pattern

Fold over the sleeves, matching them up on the lower edge.  Place a pin at the center fold on the top.

Fold over the sleeves, matching them up on the lower edge. Place a pin at the center fold on the top.

Cut out the neck hole, which is 2-1/2” long across, and 1” in depth. I marked the 2-1/2” mark with pins to be my guide.

Cut out the neck hole, which is 2-1/2” long across, and 1” in depth. I marked the 2-1/2” mark with pins to be my guide.

1” strips of blue for the shirt cuff.  Line up and iron into place

1” strips of blue for the shirt cuff. Line up and iron into place

Add the overalls part to the lower portion, and iron into place

Add the overalls part to the lower portion, and iron into place

 

Flip it over and cut from the back, using the felt as your guide

Flip it over and cut from the back, using the felt as your guide

 

Flip it over and cut from the back, using the felt as your guide

Flip it over and cut from the back, using the felt as your guide

Add the red on the sleeve portion, and cut the pockets which are 2” squares. Add ¾” strips for the overall straps.  They hang over onto the blue, which is hard to see. Iron everything into place.  From the back, so you can see the neck opening, cut the fabric away, to open it up.

Add the red on the sleeve portion, and cut the pockets which are 2” squares. Add ¾” strips for the overall straps. They hang over onto the blue, which is hard to see. Iron everything into place. From the back, so you can see the neck opening, cut the fabric away, to open it up.

 

 

White fabric for the text.  The largest one is for the name of the baby and it is 1” high, all others are ¾” high.  You can make them any length you want.  I didn’t use plain while fabric, but chose a fabric with a slight print on it in faded gray.  These are fused, and are ironed to a Mistyfuse Goddess Sheet, so I can write my text easier.  You can iron them to a piece of parchment paper if you so desire.

White fabric for the text. The largest one is for the name of the baby and it is 1” high, all others are ¾” high. You can make them any length you want. I didn’t use plain while fabric, but chose a fabric with a slight print on it in faded gray. These are fused, and are ironed to a Mistyfuse Goddess Sheet, so I can write my text easier. You can iron them to a piece of parchment paper if you so desire.

I hand wrote the information on the white strips with a Pentel Gel Roller for Fabric.  If you don’t trust your handwriting, you could print out the text from your computer, and then trace it onto the white fabric.  I would suggest cutting more white strips than you need, in case you flub up.  I did, of course.  Trim the sides, so that the text is centered.

I hand wrote the information on the white strips with a Pentel Gel Roller for Fabric. If you don’t trust your handwriting, you could print out the text from your computer, and then trace it onto the white fabric. I would suggest cutting more white strips than you need, in case you flub up. I did, of course. Trim the sides, so that the text is centered.

 

Place strips on the overalls, making sure it stays centered and then iron into place.  It’s looking good!  Get out your coordinating color for the back.  This will add stability to the piece.  Lay it into place and pin, so you can take it to the sewing machine.

Place strips on the overalls, making sure it stays centered and then iron into place. It’s looking good! Get out your coordinating color for the back. This will add stability to the piece. Lay it into place and pin, so you can take it to the sewing machine.

 

The sewing part.  Using your sewing machine, sew with a straight stitch over the entire piece, with the sleeves open.  You can use a free motion foot too.  You just want to get everything sewn down.  The text and the pockets and all around the edges.  And don’t forget the neck opening. Press it one more time, so it is flat.

The sewing part. Using your sewing machine, sew with a straight stitch over the entire piece, with the sleeves open. You can use a free motion foot too. You just want to get everything sewn down. The text and the pockets and all around the edges. And don’t forget the neck opening. Press it one more time, so it is flat.

 

Hand sew on the buttons, from your collection.   I used a variety of funky buttons.  I used red Perle Cotton #8 thread.

Hand sew on the buttons, from your collection. I used a variety of funky buttons. I used red Perle Cotton #8 thread.

 

Hand sew the sleeves on the lower portion, but not in the center portion of the back, leave open.  You can see in the lower left hand corner, that this portion is hand sewn.

Hand sew the sleeves on the lower portion, but not in the center portion of the back, leave open. You can see in the lower left hand corner, that this portion is hand sewn.

 

Insert your hanger from the back, and now you have a ‘cute as a button’ baby quilt to hang on the wall.  Be sure to add a label inside, that you made it and date it.  Fabulous!

Insert your hanger from the back, and now you have a ‘cute as a button’ baby quilt to hang on the wall. Be sure to add a label inside, that you made it and date it. Fabulous!

 

The girl baby quilt is made the same as the boy, just different measurements, because you are making a dress.  This will help you make a pattern.  12” wide by 15” high

The girl baby quilt is made the same as the boy, just different measurements, because you are making a dress. This will help you make a pattern. 12” wide by 15” high

 

Cut the neck first, scroll up to the boy quilt, and see the steps

Cut the neck first, scroll up to the boy quilt, and see the steps

 

 

Place your fabrics on the black felt, and then press into place.  Cut from the back.

Place your fabrics on the black felt, and then press into place. Cut from the back.

 

 

Add the fabrics.  One for the sleeve portion and one for the skirt.  Using the skirt fabric cut flower pedals for the neck line.  Use sharp scissors and fussy cut them.  They don’t have to be perfect, just generally around the same size.  Place them on the neckline, and press into place.

Add the fabrics. One for the sleeve portion and one for the skirt. Using the skirt fabric cut flower pedals for the neck line. Use sharp scissors and fussy cut them. They don’t have to be perfect, just generally around the same size. Place them on the neckline, and press into place.

 

Cut two strips about 1” wide, and then cut wavy lines, so it ends up being about ¾” wide.  Press into place.

Cut two strips about 1” wide, and then cut wavy lines, so it ends up being about ¾” wide. Press into place.

 

Cute little pockets.  I cut two pockets that are 2” squares.  Then cut one where I rounded the corners on the lower edge. Take that pocket and lay it over the other square to use as your guide for cutting.

Cute little pockets. I cut two pockets that are 2” squares. Then cut one where I rounded the corners on the lower edge. Take that pocket and lay it over the other square to use as your guide for cutting.

 

Take out your coordinating felt for the backing.  You can either leave it 12×15 and sew the quilt, or cut it the same size as your pattern.  The second layer will add stability to your piece, especially during the sewing part.  Cut out the neck portion before you start sewing.

 

Scroll up to see how text is done, then place it on the dress and press into place

Scroll up to see how text is done, then place it on the dress and press into place

 

Using your sewing machine, with a straight stitch, sew around the entire dress, text, neckline pedals and pockets.  I added some pedals on the pockets with stitching.  Be sure to sew around the neckline.  Then press to get the entire dress flat.  Fold over the sleeves and hand sew just the lower sleeve portion.  Visual is in the boy instructions.

Using your sewing machine, with a straight stitch, sew around the entire dress, text, neckline pedals and pockets. I added some pedals on the pockets with stitching. Be sure to sew around the neckline. Then press to get the entire dress flat. Fold over the sleeves and hand sew just the lower sleeve portion. Visual is in the boy instructions.

 

 

I sewed the buttons with pink Perle Cotton #8 thread.   Inserted the baby hanger from the back.  Modern Baby Girl – finished 12” across, and 11-1/2” from shoulder to hem.  Happy quilting!

I sewed the buttons with pink Perle Cotton #8 thread. Inserted the baby hanger from the back. Modern Baby Girl – finished 12” across, and 11-1/2” from shoulder to hem. Happy quilting!

 

Click Here For Additional Jamie Fingal Designs

Click here for a printable PDF of Modern Baby by Jamie Fingal

Posted in Craft to make, Fabric Art, Fabric Cutter, Fiber Art, Free Craft Projects, Jamie Fingal, Wall Hangings | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Appliqué Scrap Quilt

Cold Feet

by Terry White

Cold Feet Child's Quilt TW

 Child’s Quilt Measures 38″x 46″

This bird is so hot that she decided to make her perch on a cold summer treat! My design is very simple, so the fabric colors are the key to this very happy summery quilt. I am using CherryWood fabrics in some of their newer clear colors. The stitching is done with Star Cotton threads. I love this particular match up of materials because they work really well together….stitching-wise and color-wise. The cool blue/green bubbles fabric is from Sew Batik. The bright turquoise hand dye for the bird is a piece from Joy’s Fabrics.

The bird pattern has a drawn eye, however, I chose to replace the drawing of the eye with a blue on white polka dot fabric. One thing led to another…..the new eye design became the corner squares! Even the smallest change on one thing can lead to a big change in the whole design of the quilt. The corner square design would never exist if I hadn’t changed the eyeball!

Blue Polka Dot Eyeball

A variation on this design would be adorable made with all prints. This is a scrap appliqué quilt. You can even use fat quarters for each appliqué section.

This is an easy quilt to make. All the techniques you might need to learn are contained in the four e-books”Quilt Instructions for the Beginner”  Click here for all the books.

quilt instructions for the beginner part 1 cover 480x625

Supplies You Will Need:

 FABRICS:Fabrics for Cold feet

 1 yard yellow dot for appliqué blocks

Cut into 19″x 15″ rectangles…you can use four fat-quarters

 Appliqués- Each appliqué is so small and requires small scraps of fabric. One 15 inch square of blue fabric is enough for the bird body and the pop sticks. The rest require less than that.

 1 yard of blue/green fabric for lattice strips and corner blocks

 Cut lattice strips 4 1/2 inches wide-wait to cut the length until you have appliquéd the panels and trimmed them. Then cut the length of the lattice strips the same lengths as the lengths of the two sides of the appliquéd panel.

 Cut 9 corner blocks 4 1/2 inch square

 1 1/3 yard for backing

 1/3 yard of red for binding

 1 yard of fusible web ( I use Wonder Under)

 4 pieces of non-woven medium weight interfacing cut into 19″x 15″ rectangles

 Batting- this is up to you….see batting recommendations in e-book

 Threads

THREADS:

The first group of threads are for the appliqué

 The blue sewing thread is for stitching the quilt top together

 The green/blue and yellow threads are for the quilting

 TOOLS: Cutting Tools

Cutting Tools

I used the new Havel’s Sewing Pink Cutting Mat and Fabric Cutter for cutting my fabric…this tool is really easy on my hands! I use the 5 1/2″ curved scissors to cut out my curved appliqué pieces. I also use them to cut threads from the quilt top…they curve away from the fabric so that I don’t get unexpected holes in my work.The 8″ bent serrated scissors are my go to for many things….they live on my cutting table!

Iron

Sewing Machine- Bernina if you have it

Machine Needle- 90/14 machine embroidery needle

Appliqué Design Fused

Design Area

The total design area of the bird on the pop is 16″ x 9″. Here is the appliqués fused to the background fabric.

 each with the interfacing.

Trace the bird appliqué pieces onto fusible web…making sure that you are tracing  the reverse side of the design. Do the same with the ice pop pattern.????????? I can reverse the patterns for them???????

Shapes Traced On Fusible Web

Ice Pop Tracings on Fusible Web

When tracing the individual pattern pieces, extend some of the outlines when the piece will be underneath another piece.

The bird’s feet- extend the leg about 1/4 inch so it can be placed underneath the bird body.

The center section of the ice pop- make the inside line bigger than the drawing, this piece will be placed underneath the main ice pop piece.

 Appliqué Shape Traced Bigger Than Design

Overlapping Tracings

Eye Appliqué Cut from Blue Polka Dot

Bird’s Eyeball

For the white fabrics which will be appliquéd to the quilt, I fuse the white fabric to another piece of white fabric first. This adds some body to the eye and corner block circles and it keeps the darker fabric from shadowing through.

11 ColdFeetTW

 Corner Block Circles

Appliqués For Each Block Stacked On Cardstock

Groups of appliqué pieces for each block

By grouping the appliqués for each block together, you can keep your work organized and be sure that each block has all of its pieces.

 Fold Background Fabric in Half Lengthwise

Fold-line in fabric

Fold your background fabric in half lengthwise and finger press. This will help in the placement of the appliqués.  Lay each block on interfacing. This will insure better machine embroidery.

Place your appliqué pieces onto the background fabric.

Some pieces will overlap. Look at the design for placement, for instance;

The bird’s feet are placed under the bird body.

Bird feet 2Bird leg lengthenedBird Body Overlaps Leg

The Ice Pop details are placed under the main piece.

Center Appliqué Cut Bigger Than Drawing             Ice pop 2Ice Pop Shape Overlaps Central Shape

Fuse your appliqué pieces into place for each of the four blocks.

For my stitching, I used a tiny buttonhole stitch and cotton threads in colors that enhanced each appliqué piece.

 18 Stitch ColdFeetTW

Appliqué under Presser Foot

The key to the very small curves and points is to stitch slowly and watch where the needle goes into the work. If you can stop, turn the work a little bit, then stitch as you go around a curve, then you can keep the stitches right along the edge of the work all around. For instance, I make one stitch at a time when I’m stitching around the eyeball.

 Machine Settings for Appliqué

Stitch Settings on the sewing machine

For appliqué, First, I choose the stitch, then I tweak it so that it is exactly what I want.

I set my buttonhole stitch so that the edge of the stitch is in center needle position so that I can stitch right along the edge of the appliqué.

I change the width and length of the stitch for a smaller stitch.

I lower the top tension so that I get a prettier, fuller stitch.

I increased the presser foot pressure to have greater control over the fabric.

Appliqué the circles onto the corner squares

20 Corner Blocks ColdFeetTW

Corner Squares with Circle Motifs

Stitch the quilt top together.

At this point, it is good to trim the appliqué panel to make sure it is square. Then, use the real measurements to determine the length of the lattice strips.

2 Rows-Stitch together two blocks with strips in between and on each end

21 Layout ColdFeetTW

 Blocks Sewn with Strips

3 Rows- Stitch corner block,strip,corner block, strip, corner block

 22 Layout 2 ColdfeetTW

Layout for Sewing

Stitch rows together.

Layer with batting and backing.

Baste layers together.

MACHINE QUILT:

Quilting Pattern

 Section of Quilt

 Close-up of Quilting Suns on the Top24 Quilting ColdFeetTW

 Section of Quilt

25 SunQuilting ColdFeetTW

 Close-up of Quilting Suns on the Bottom

 26 Bubble Quilting ColdFeetTW

Close-up of Quilting Bubbles in the Borders

Bind the quilt in red.

DESIGNS:

 Layout for Bird Pops Quilt

Original Layout Design

Bird Appliqué Design TW

 Bird Appliqué

Ice Pop Appliqué Design TW

Ice Pop Appliqué

30 Quilting Pattern ColdfeetTW

Quilting Design

Click Here For Additional Projects By Terry White

Posted in Baby Quilt, Fabric Art, Fabric Scissors, Fiber Art, For Baby, For Beginners in Sewing, Free Quilt Projects, Quilting, Terry White, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

5 Must Know Tips for Sewing Patchwork

3patches8blog

If you’ve finally decided to pick up the art of quilting, chances are you might feel a bit lost when it comes to doing things the right way. Quilting, like anything else, has its own set of dos and don’ts that more experienced quilters have had to learn over time. Through trial and error (perhaps a little more error …), veteran quilters have come up with a set of rules to always remember, especially if this is your first go-around. Of course, one thing you could do is sign up for a beginner’s quilting class, but why search around for a class near you and pay for every session when you’ve got someone like Terry White to steer you in the right direction?

Terry White, a fabric artist and quilting expert from Indiana, has been perfecting her craft for a number of years. In her eBook Quilt Instructions for the Beginner – Part 3, White outlines a number of important details and general rules for all your quilting and patchwork needs. Here are the 5 must-know tips before beginning your next project:

  1. Seam allowance is ¼ inch. This helps to control the shapes of patchwork. More than ¼ inch is unnecessary and less is not wide enough to keep the seams from fraying.
  2. Use the same thread in the bobbin as the top thread. You can choose a neutral color that blends with the colors of your patchwork, instead of changing the thread colors all the time. Here are examples of threads that work for these color combinations.
  3. Try to cut and stitch each fabric piece as perfectly as possible … knowing full well that it is hard to make perfect happen. Each cut and each seam that is just “a little bit off” will eventually add up to “a lot off.”
  4. Press, press, press … This is different than ironing fabric into submission and distorting the pieces. Gently pressing your seams as you piece will go a long way towards beautiful patchwork. I like to press every set of seams as I piece. The patchwork fabric is easier to manipulate when you press as you go. It is very hard to press an entire quilt if you haven’t been pressing it section by section. The seams are pressed open to distribute the seam bulk in the corners. This block will stay flat and be easy to quilt.
  5. Use the correct needle size and type for the thread and the fabric. Generally, I like a 75/11 machine embroidery needle. It has a nice sharp point and, most importantly, it lasts a long time. Embroidery needles are built to last for a long time. Have you ever seen an embroidery machine go? The needle works very hard! Batik fabrics are very tightly woven and have wax residue from the printing process, so for batiks I switch to a Microtex needle.

Click Here For More Quilting Tips by Terry White

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